The Detailed Story of the Battle told Here


Pennsylvania Labor History Society 2018 Annual Awards Dinner

The Pennsylvania Labor History Society recognized four labor activists at their 2018 Annual Banquet for their lifelong interest in preserving the history of working men and women and their commitment to advancing the interests of working families.

We are proud to recognize the following labor activists for their lifelong interest in...Read More »


2018 Pennsylvania Labor History Conference

The 2018 PLHS Conference was held September 22, 2018 at Community College of Allegheny College -Pittsburgh Campus. This year’s program was entitled ‘Vietnam: A Working Class War’ and featured panel discussions and presentations regarding Vietnam War activism and related topics. The goal of this program was to...Read More »


 

On August 15, 2018 we invited these young historians to the Pump House to give us the details of their project and to recognize them for their hard work.

Young Historians Honored for their National History Day Winning Exhibit on the Battle of Homestead

 

The 2018 theme was Conflict and Compromise in History. A group exhibit in the Junior category became one of the most rewarded entries using the Battle of Homestead as the topic. Students Robyn, Sophia, and Amelia, eighth-graders at Peters Township Middle School, tackled the theme and concluded there was no...Read More »


 


ABOUT THE BATTLE OF HOMESTEAD FOUNDATION

The Battle of Homestead Foundation (BHF) is a diverse organization of citizens, workers, educators and historians. It’s purpose is to preserve, interpret, and promote a people’s history focused on the significance of the dramatic labor conflict at Homestead, Pa. in 1892.

Many people interested in the Battle, as well as the history of the working class and the Labor movement, are dedicated to preserving the Pump House (the sole existing structure of the 1892 Homestead Steel Works) as a labor monument to working people that will attract tourism, labor groups, students, and anyone in any way interested in Western Pennsylvania’s fascinating industrial and labor heritage. The BHF strives to assist and abet these interests and efforts. Read More About Us Here


Join Us! Become a Member!

Membership: Get updates on events and happenings of the Battle of Homestead Foundation by becoming a new member, or renewing your membership!
Members receive notice of all BHF events and business and are eligible to vote for Directors of the BHF Board. Membership is open to all persons who pledge to support the BHF mission and make an annual membership contribution.

With your membership you also get free admission to the Heinz History Center via their Affiliates Program. The annual membership card we send you will allow up to four persons per visit to the Heinz History Center, The Fort Pitt Museum, and the Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village.

Here’s How!


 Yesterday and Tomorrow – The Legacy of the 1892 Homestead Strike

featured-imageThe Battle of Homestead is the most famous event in American labor history, and perhaps the most significant. Just after dawn on July 6, 1892, the battle erupted when locked-out steelworkers of the Carnegie Steel works at Homestead, together with citizens of the town, broke into the closed and fortified mill nick-named “Fort Frick” after CEO Henry Frick. On the bank of the Monongahela River, they confronted a private army of Pinkerton agents hired by Frick as they attempted to land and secure the mill. The battle was soon joined, and raged throughout the day with gunfire, burning oil, and cannon.

At day’s end, the Pinkertons surrendered. Seven workers and three Pinkerton “detectives” lay dead, with others wounded. When the Pinkertons were led away they were humiliated and beaten as they passed through a gauntlet of enraged women, children and townspeople. The conflict marked a watershed in U.S. labor relations and casts a deep shadow to this day.

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Many students of the Homestead battle see it as a signal event in establishing the predominance of the rights of capital over rights of labor in the workplace. While legal and supra-legal suppression of workers was nothing new, Homestead seemed to draw the lines as never before. For several decades after, corporate violence against workers, especially immigrant workers, in the form of private enforcement agencies like the Pinkertons and the infamous Coal and Iron Police, was acceptable, even when the human rights of workers were clearly violated and public sentiment favored their cause.

The Battle of Homestead Foundation was founded to preserve the Pump House, as well as the many stories it has to tell.

The Detailed Story of the Battle told Here